Marcy housing projects

They were constructed during the first decade following World War II in response to the influx of people seeking affordable housing in Greater New York. Initially home to mainly former soldiers and their families, Marcy City lost many of these early residents during the suburban migration of the s and s. The tenants today are mainly African American and Hispanic, though recently there have been more Russian immigrants as well.

Marcy housing projects

Four of the Most Dangerous New York City Projects | Manhattan, New York, NY | News

Four of the Most Dangerous New York City Projects NYPress Make text smaller Make text larger Photos by Alissa Fleck Violence is on the rise in the City this summer and cops blame everything from heat waves to the recession to tensions caused by-the ultimate hot-button issue-stop-and-frisk or would that be the impending soda ban?

Unfortunately, either way, the City's housing projects seem to suffer most in times like these. While it's nearly impossible to point to the City's most dangerous projects, here we report on conditions in four of the most problematic and dilapidated repeat-offenders.

It was just an elevator repairman. A commenter on the blog speaks to the level of disrepair in the project: Brownsville Houses Brownsville is the highest housing project concentration area in Brooklyn, and generally considered one of the City's most dangerous neighborhoods.

There are 18 projects in the mile and a half stretch of Brownsville, including the Brownsville development, which contains 27 buildings. James Brodick, project director of Brownsville Community Justice Center, described Brownsville aspeople "living on top of each other," which certainly sounds like a recipe for disaster.

Brodick also offered up generations of poverty issues and territorial disputes as deeply rooted causes the Brownsville projects have so much consistent trouble avoiding infamy's spotlight. While news reports point to the human danger in Bed-Stuy's Marcy Projects, a perhaps greater concern is t[hree-foot rats might get to you ] http: Pelham Parkway It might be enough to say residents of the Pelham Parkway Complex in the Bronx, which recently witnessed the murder of an year-old grandmother, refer to a section of the project as "Siberia" and refuse to set foot there.

City Councilman James Vacca, who oversees the Bronx district that includes Pelham, knows exactly where Siberia is located.

Violence spills over into the community, he reports, which manifests in the numerous shootings at stores just across the street.

Again, violence and disrepair-a general overarching sense of apathy and hopelessness-seem to go hand-in-hand. Vacca pointed to things which discourage Pelham residents most:The Manhattan-based Development and Services Corporation (D&S) was established, which was composed of business, banking and professional leaders which advised and fundraised private funding for the BSRC's projects.

metin2sell.comville Houses Brownsville is the highest housing project concentration area in Brooklyn, and generally considered one of the City's most dangerous neighborhoods.

Marcy housing projects

There are 18 projects in the mile and a half stretch of Brownsville, including the Brownsville development, which contains 27 buildings. Watch video · The man born Shawn Carter grew up in Brooklyn, New York, in the Marcy Houses, a housing project in the borough's Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood.

Marcy housing projects

My name Cynthia hines i live in Brooklyn new York lady name audrey and three sisters live in marcy housing on park ave in i do not no audrey last name i have Facebook Delisa bynum hines sent to me Delisa bynum Hines. Posts about Marcy Projects.

Ese Mojarrita is in Marcy Projects/5().

Developments

Shawn "Jay-Z" Carter (born ), rapper, who lived in the Marcy Housing Projects for most of his childhood Jaz-O (born ), rapper [ citation needed ] Joey Badass (born ), rapper [71]. New York City’s housing projects are the last of their kind in the country. And they may be on their way to extinction.

Developments - NYCHA