Vertigo and rear window essay

The essay outlines an idea about the "male gaze" in which men have the power to actively look upon passive female bodies. Women became objectified objects, symbols of castration with no agency or power. Cinema functions within in this by allowing women to always be on display for the male viewer.

Vertigo and rear window essay

On a literal level it is a mystery-suspense story of a man hoodwinked into acting as an accomplice in a murder, his discovery of the hoax, and the unraveling of the threads of the murder plot.

On a psychological level the film traces the twisted, circuitous routes of a psyche burdened down with guilt, desperately searching for an object on which to concentrate its repressed energy.

Rear Window and Vertigo: Hitchcock films

Finally, on an allegorical or figurative level, it is a retelling of the immemorial tale of a man who has lost his love to death and in hope of redeeming her descends into the underworld, the most famous of these stories being that of Orpheus and Eurydice in Greek Mythology.

Scottie is a San Francisco police detective who, during a rooftop chase, nearly plunges to his death. The psychological scars left by this incident and, probably more significantly, by the guilt of having been responsible for the death of a fellow officer who tried to rescue him, induce in Scottie a phobia--vertigo, or fear of high places, the phobia which initially caused his accident.

Throughout the rest of the film Scottie remains psychologically and symbolically suspended from that rooftop. He takes on a job as a private detective for an old college friend named Gavin Elster Tom Helmore who is worried about the strange behavior of his wife, Madeleine Kim Novakwhom Scottie has never met.

Madeleine is a wanderer, and in trailing her, Scottie becomes one too.

Rear Window and Vertigo: Hitchcock films - words | Study Guides and Book Summaries Get Access Rear Window and Vertigo: Hitchcock films Rear Window and Vertigo are two Hitchcock films in which the main character shows voyeuristic behavior, experiences relationship problems and suffers from some sort of a handicap, be It physical or psychological.
Alfred Hitchcock: A Visual Analysis The notion of Voyeurism is used to signify the name of the game that is played in the film. In general, I would characterize the film as truly brilliant and suspenseful.
compare and contrast vertigo and rear window from an artists point of view Essay Topics On a literal level it is a mystery-suspense story of a man hoodwinked into acting as an accomplice in a murder, his discovery of the hoax, and the unraveling of the threads of the murder plot.
Hire writer Rear Window and Vertigo are two Hitchcock films in which the main character shows voyeuristic behavior, experiences relationship problems and suffers from some sort of a handicap, be It physical or psychological.
Vertigo, Alfred Hitchcock Check out these five video essays.

As he follows her through museums, graveyards, and forest haunts he becomes obsessed with this phantom woman who apparently believes herself to be the reincarnation of a turn-of-the-century belle named Carlotta. In the scenes of Scottie tailing Madeleine by car through the streets of San Francisco, the vehicle seems to be floating above the pavement.

This feeling is enhanced even more by the lilting, musical background of master film composer Bernard Herrmann. Her appearance, her strange visits to places which Carlotta frequented, and her speech all seem to confirm her belief that she is the reincarnated Carlotta.

As noted before, however, Scottie is no longer a logical, detached observer, and because the viewer is given no more information than Scottie, neither is he. The romance which develops between this obsessive searcher and this half-phantom, half-woman magnificently exploits San Francisco and its environs as a backdrop.

The locations chosen are all connected with the past and with time: Even the details within scenes are keyed as symbols for the timeless state Scottie has entered: The central symbol for the film is, however, the mission at San Juan Batista. Steeped in history, the mission is safely isolated from the everyday world.

It is to these ancestral roots that Madeleine returns, and it is here that Scottie is forced to confront not only his obsession with her but also his phobia. In an agonizingly painful scene, Madeleine jumps from the tower as Scottie, frozen by his acrophobia and unable to climb the staircase, is forced to watch, for a second time, someone fall to his death.

The confusion of dream and reality is now almost total. The viewer is as perplexed as Scottie as he proceeds to take advantage of this second chance fate has apparently handed him.

It is at this moment in the film that Hitchcock makes his most daring move. For the first time he gives the audience access to more information than what is known to Scottie. The tone of the film now changes drastically as the viewer is given back, at least partially, his distance and his objectivity.

The mood becomes much more ironic as the audience watches Scottie transform Judy in clothes, makeup, hairstyle, and speech into his image of Madeleine.

Bathed in an ethereal green light, she embraces Scottie, who is now completely lost in the dream, and the camera begins a series of dizzying degrees tracking shots around the couple.

Scottie looks up from the embrace and the apartment has become the mission stables in which he first passionately kissed Madeleine.

Alfred Hitchcock: A Visual Analysis

He takes Judy to the mission bell tower and, dragging her behind him, ascends the staircase to the parapet. Elated by his victory, he turns to Judy as if to embrace her. At the moment of his triumph, however, a figure in black appears a nun literally, figuratively the image of death or moral retributionand a terrified Judy falls to her death.

Scottie walks to the edge of the tower and stares down disconsolately. Instead of breaking the pattern as he intended, he has only succeeded in repeating it. His vertigo has been conquered, but at the price of a second love.

Vertigo and rear window essay

VERTIGO is probably one of the most potent influences on a whole generation of filmmakers, particularly the French New Wave, which paid homage to the film again and again. Fortunately, filmgoers now have the great opportunity to view it again and again. Click for more on Vertigo Review Sources: May 29,p.

June 2,p. June 16,p. May 14,p.Rear Window and Vertigo: Hitchcock films Essay Rear Window and Vertigo are two Hitchcock films in which the main character shows voyeuristic behavior, experiences relationship problems and suffers from some sort of a handicap, be it physical or psychological.

Rear Window .

Rear Window and Vertigo: Hitchcock films | Literature Essays

Alfred Hitchcock And ‘Rear Window’ If you are the original writer of this essay and no longer wish to have the essay published on the UK Essays website then please click on the link below to request removal: Request the removal of this essay. More from UK Essays. Related Documents: Alfred Hitchcock and Rear Window Essay Alfred Joseph Hitchcock Bio Essay October 29, Alfred Joseph Hitchcock Alfred Joseph Hitchcock, was born on August 13, in Leytonstone, England.

Vouyerism: A House Role. The major theme of the Rear Window film is the theme of obsession and human curiosity.

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The notion of Voyeurism is used to signify the name of the game that is played in the film. In general, I would characterize the film as truly brilliant and suspenseful. Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window Essay Words | 5 Pages. Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window In Rear Window, Alfred Hitchcock took a plot-driven short story and transformed it into a character-driven movie.

Rear Window and Vertigo: Hitchcock films Essay Rear Window and Vertigo are two Hitchcock films in which the main character shows voyeuristic behavior, experiences relationship problems and suffers from some sort of a handicap, be it physical or psychological.

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